Wordsmith Apprentice

sassmaster-general:

miss-andrea:

murderwhitepeople:

White men are never taught self hate

keen social insight from tumblr user murder white people

Erasure of white men belonging to minorities other than racial ones (gay, bi, pan, ace, trans, disabled): check

Erasure of men with body image issues: check

Erasure of mentally ill men: check

Conclusion: tumblr user murderwhitepeople is a massive dumbass

Also men raised by radfems. Can’t forget those poor souls.

nezua:

rubyvroom:

Sorry for the extremely lengthy post on your dashes but this is so important

The world is watching, White America.

FIGHT TERRORISM, STOP COPS.

We can’t trust the government. There’s always war propaganda: The Russians are gonna get us, the Southerners are gonna get us, the Spanish were gonna get us, the Mexicans—there’s always some bad guy over the next hill that you’ve always got to give all power and devotion to the government so that they can go and kill people. Well, you know, there’s something wrong with that. If we just think of the basic libertarian principle that it’s never morally acceptable to use violence or the threat of violence agains the innocent… In war, the vast majority of the people who are killed are innocent people…
Lew Rockwell (via eltigrechico)
The words “male” and “female” are not for describing people.

I have been noticing this gross trend on here of referring to men as “males”.

That’s utterly disrespectful, and implies that their species is in question.

I swear the first person who refers to me as a male rather than a man is getting the earful of a lifetime. I would expect anyone referred to as a male or female to react in the same fashion.

It’s dehumanizing to be described as your sex as if that is the prime known characteristic about you.

It’s also the way law enforcement refers to people, so there’s that. Everything they say and do is a calculated insult meant to suppress your natural authority over yourself and promote compliance, so yeah, if you are talking like them, you are acting like an ass.

Anyway, it has not happened yet, but I will seriously freak if some asshole indicates me in this fashion.

banditblossom:

jsyk, only 2.9% of the population in Canada is black, and yet black Canadians makes 80% of prisons and are mostly likely to get mistreated in them

tell me again racism doesn’t exist Canada. (: 

Ok, so I just read that link, and that is not what they are saying at all.

They are saying that nearly one in ten prisoners in Canada is black, and that is more than enough to point to an injustice.

You don’t need to misquote an even worse figure to inflate the issue. (The 80% number is how much the black prison population has jumped in the last decade).

Also, it’s not black people who are mistreated the worst or most in Canadian jails.

It’s First Nations people. They are the ones that bear that burden here. Even the article acknowledges that.

Fist Nations people make up only 4% of Canada’s population (a crime in and of itself), and they make up 22% of prisoners.

So, yes it’s rough to be black in Canada, but not as rough as it is to be of the First Nations.

To me, the idea of performing 100,000 mutilative procedures on newborns to possibly prevent cancer in one elderly man is absurd.
George Denniston, M.D. (via uncutting)
120 plays

p0larity:

leadnow.ca has created a radio advertisement decrying Stephen Harper’s secretive FIPA.

For non-Canadians, our prime-minister Stephen Harper signed a binding agreement with China that lasts for 31 years. It allows Chinese businesses to sue Canada if we come up with laws with interfere with them making profits. Such laws would include: basically any environmental laws.

He signed this act in secret, despite widespread disapproval and has screwed over his own country to suit his own ends.

This cretin and his coup have to go. This is the guy who renamed the government of Canada to The Harper Government™.

allthecanadianpolitics:

Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 
Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 
"I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 
Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 
"The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 
Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.
Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 
Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 
Excerpts from his blog: 

The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.
A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.
Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.
Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.
I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.
A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. See more here. 

allthecanadianpolitics:

Tory staffer fired after supporting inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women

A Manitoba Conservative staffer who expressed support for a missing women’s inquiry was fired for voicing a viewpoint that veered from the party line on the issue. 

Spencer Fernando, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus in Manitoba, had recently attended a vigil for 15-year-old Aboriginal girl Tina Fontaine, whose body was found wrapped in a bag and dumped in the Red River in Winnipeg in August. Her death sparked outcry and renewed calls for an inquiry into the nation’s 1,181 missing or murdered Aboriginal women. 

"I heard a lot of people discussing the need for an inquiry. You could feel the emotion in their voices…so I felt compelled to share my own thoughts," he told the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network. 

Fernando said he wasn’t necessarily fired by the Conservatives for his blog post, but that the party was not happy about him expressing his views about the matter. 

"The concern was, that as a member of the caucus staff, I should not be taking policy positions publicly." 

Statistics show that Aboriginal women are disproportionately affected by violent crime, despite the fact that Aboriginal people are only 4.3 per cent of the national population. In Saskatchewan, 55 per cent of the female murder victims from 1980-2012 were Aboriginal (see RCMP report for further statistics). In Ferndando’s home province of Manitoba, Aborignal women comprised 49 per cent of female murder victims, despite comprising just 16.7 per cent of the total Manitoban population.

Aboriginal women are not only more likely to be killed, but also 3.5 times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women in Canada. 

Fernando’s blog post said an inquiry would not only bring causes of violence against Aboriginal women to light, but show that government viewed Indigenous women as “worthy of national attention”. 

Excerpts from his blog: 

The fact is that this is an ongoing problem. So it’s not enough to investigate deaths after they happen. We need to find a way to prevent the deaths from happening, and an inquiry could help achieve that goal.

A public inquiry would accomplish something else of importance as well. It would send a clear message that the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is seen as worthy of national attention.

Injustice and despair thrives in the shadows. An inquiry could bring these things into the light. An inquiry would send a message that, while we can’t change our past, we are willing to learn from it.

Yes, an inquiry could bring up some dark truths. Yet, by facing those truths with clear eyes and open hearts, we can learn, grow, and respond together, as one nation.

I believe that Canada will not achieve our full potential until all who live within our borders feel respected and valued, and feel like an equal part of our Canadian family.

A public inquiry would be an important step along the road to healing, and greater security for all. That is why I support a public inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women.


Fernando is not the only Conservative-aligned voice calling for more action on missing Aboriginal women in Canada. Although not part of the party, Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall — described as the Conservative movement’s ‘best communicator’ — has also expressed his support for an inquiry into missing and murdered women. 

See more here.